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Action Alert: DNR Covert Operation Exposes Clandestine Canned Shooting Pen

 

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

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DNR Covert Operation Exposes Clandestine Canned Shooting Pen

You can take action on this alert by reading the information below and following the directions at the bottom.

Issue

This week the Commissioner of Natural Resources, Chris Clark, issued Administrative Orders holding two individuals responsible for alleged violations of Georgias Game and Fish laws. Thank your legislators for standing strong for fair chase in GA.

Background

In the words of Americas stalwart conservationist Teddy Roosevelt, those who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own exertions these are the real enemies of game.

This week the Commissioner of Natural Resources, Chris Clark, issued Administrative Orders holding two individuals responsible for alleged violations of Georgias Game and Fish laws. According to these administrative orders and subsequent press release via DNR, these individuals were operating outside the law with clandestine canned hunting operations. Additionally, DNR indicates the movement of animals from one enclosure to a high fence shooting pen could potentially place Georgias hunting heritage and deer herd at risk (see DNR Press Release below).

In Georgia, it is unlawful to shoot exotic wildlife in pens, regardless of the acreage. Despite numerous attempts in recent years by those fair chase antagonists who desire to offer staged hunting venues for farm-raised exotic wildlife and brand sportsmen and sportswomen with a black eye, the Georgia General Assembly has stood firm against these deceitful efforts. Thanks to the stalwart efforts of those state legislators who stand strong against any efforts to erode or diminish the high ethical standards of fair chase in Georgia, we as sportsmen and sportswomen can be assured our sporting heritage will continue unblemished for future generations to enjoy.

Georgia is #1 in a lot of ways, but Georgia is now the number one hunting destination in the United States. Why is Georgia NUMBER ONE??!!! Simple professional wildlife management, private and public land/wildlife stewardship is a highly valued standard in our culture, a commitment to ethical standards of fair chase is taught to our children and our legislators continue to support sound wildlife management principals while rejecting any attempt to lower the standards of fair chase.

We often fail to express gratitude to our elected officials when they get it right. High ethical standards of fair chase are valued by Georgias citizens, hunters, and anglers. Our state legislators need to be encouraged to stand strong for FAIR CHASE in GEORGIA!

Please take a moment from your busy day to SEND a letter of appreciation to these public servants for providing our wildlife agency the well-executed conservation and enforcement tools necessary to stop this and future threats to our outdoor traditions.


DNR WRD PRESS RELEASE:

ONGOING INVESTIGATION LEADS TO LARGE CIVIL PENALTIES FOR MULTIPLE VIOLATIONS FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY LAND OWNER

ATLANTA, Ga. (April 21, 2009) -The Commissioner of Natural Resources today issued Administrative Orders to Washington County landowner Mr.
Jens Brynteson and Mr. David Kilgore of Madison County. The orders impose civil penalties of more than $70,000.00 on Mr. Brynteson and penalties of $2,000.00 on Mr. Kilgore for numerous violations of Georgias Game and Fish laws discovered during an 18-month investigation and subsequent search warrant findings. Additionally, the Commissioner issued Administrative Orders authorizing seizure of fallow deer herds, red deer herds and Mouflon sheep on two properties owned by Mr. Brynteson. Mr. Brynteson and Mr. Kilgore will have 30 days to file an appeal of the Administrative Order. If no appeal is filed within 30 days, the orders will be final. Further, Department officials today issued 29 misdemeanor citations to Mr. Kilgore for violating Georgias trapping laws.

Georgia law imposes strict requirements on those who operate deer farms, said Dan Forster, Director of the Wildlife Resources Division. These requirements are designed to ensure the prevention, detection and interception of wildlife-related diseases, such as chronic wasting disease and tuberculosis, which can have a devastating impact on our states conservation and agricultural economies.

The statutory purpose of deer farms is to provide an agricultural opportunity to raise non-native deer on a farm for the commercial production of food and fiber. Mr. Jens Brynteson was permitted with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the Georgia Department of Agriculture in 1999 for deer farming, but his license expired March 31 and has not been renewed. The resultant violations include multiple counts of possessing regulated wild animals without authorizing licenses and surrendering regulated wild animals to individuals who do not possess authorizing licenses. Moreover, it was discovered that he was moving farmed deer from one property and placing them in a high-fence shooting pen on a different property. These movements raise concern regarding questionable required health certifications.

In February of 2009, the Department executed search warrants pertaining to property owned by Mr. Jens Brynteson and the residence of his employee Mr. David Kilgore. Various documents and digital media were seized during the search. The seized items assisted Department officials with further identifying violations.

Not only are these types of canned hunts illegal in Georgia, the shooting of farmed deer and sheep for sport in staged hunting venues serves no legitimate role in wildlife conservation and is not supported by the majority of Georgias citizens, said Forster. These types of unethical activities threaten the use of fair chase hunting as an effective, cost-efficient management tool in Georgia and erodes the existing public support for legal hunting.

Due to the fact that the investigation is ongoing no additional information may be released at this time. For more information about DNRs Wildlife Resources Division, visit www.georgiawildlife.com . To report game and fish law violations, such as the illegal movement of non-native or native wildlife, call 1-800-241-4113.

More on Wild Animals and Farmed Deer

According to Georgia code, it is unlawful for any person to import, transport, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal (as listed in O.C.G.A. 27-5-5) without first obtaining a wild animal license (as provided in O.C.G.A. 27-5-4) from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Farmed deer may be legally held in an approved facility with a deer farming license jointly administered by the Department of Natural Resources and the Department of Agriculture.

Additionally, it is unlawful to shoot, kill or wound any wild animal held under a wild animal license or permit or any farmed deer for enjoyment, gain, amusement or sport (O.C.G.A. 27-5-12).

Wild animals are non-native wildlife such as those that may be found in zoos, circuses or educational exhibits. The possession of wild animals is strictly regulated in Georgia because of the risks they pose to public health, safety and welfare, and to native wildlife. These risks include endangering the physical safety of humans, introduction of diseases harmful to humans or wildlife and threats to native wildlife and habitats through competition.

More Info

Message To Be Sent To
Your message will be sent to each of the following targets:

Your State Representative
Your State Senator
Message
A sample message appears below, which you may edit before sending.

Thank you for standing strong for FAIR CHASE in GEORGIA!


Dear Representative,

As a Georgia sportsman, I support maintaining the highest standards of fair chase. Fair chase is a valued characteristic that I want passed on to future generations of Georgians who will respect their quarry, take their right to hunt and fish seriously and continue to represent our outdoor traditions in a responsible and meaningful way. Fair chase promotes the challenge of the hunt through the use of skill and knowledge of the quarry to pursue free-ranging game animals in their native habitats while ensuring that the superiority of the hunter over the prey is never absolute. Certainly you share the values associated with fair chase respect, honor, and responsibility.

As my state legislator, thank you for standing strong for legislation that promotes fair chase in Georgia. Furthermore, I encourage you to stand in opposition to any efforts that degrade, erode or weaken our outdoor heritage and fair chase standards in Georgia.

Please take a moment to read the press release provided by the Georgia DNR, Wildlife Resources Division, and Washington County Landowner Served Administrative Orders Regarding Multiple Violations.

I don't want wildlife violators disrespecting our hunting heritage, eroding the positive image of hunters, and devaluing conservation efforts led by sportsmen and sportswomen. It was President Teddy Roosevelt who said, "Obedience of the law is demanded; not asked as a favor." Animal rights groups use these types of activities to mischaracterize hunting, demonize sportsmen and sportswomen, and degrade our hunting heritage. We simply cannot tolerate or allow this type of valueless behavior to take root, persist, or potentially create negative consequences to the future of hunting in Georgia.

I respectfully ask for your continued support for fair chase standards in Georgia. Furthermore, I want you to oppose any legislation that would degrade or erode fair chase standards, devalue hunters, and threaten sound conservation.

Thank you for protecting fair chase hunting in Georgia, for protecting our highly valued natural resources and for the public service you provide for fellow sportsmen, my family and me at the Georgia State Capitol.



DNR WILDLIFE RESOURCES PRESS RELEASE:

ONGOING INVESTIGATION LEADS TO LARGE CIVIL PENALTIES FOR MULTIPLE VIOLATIONS FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY LAND OWNER


ATLANTA, Ga. (April 21, 2009) -The Commissioner of Natural Resources today issued Administrative Orders to Washington County landowner Mr.
Jens Brynteson and Mr. David Kilgore of Madison County. The orders impose civil penalties of more than $70,000.00 on Mr. Brynteson and penalties of $2,000.00 on Mr. Kilgore for numerous violations of Georgias Game and Fish laws discovered during an 18-month investigation and subsequent search warrant findings. Additionally, the Commissioner issued Administrative Orders authorizing seizure of fallow deer herds, red deer herds and Mouflon sheep on two properties owned by Mr. Brynteson. Mr. Brynteson and Mr. Kilgore will have 30 days to file an appeal of the Administrative Order. If no appeal is filed within 30 days, the orders will be final. Further, Department officials today issued 29 misdemeanor citations to Mr. Kilgore for violating Georgias trapping laws.

Georgia law imposes strict requirements on those who operate deer farms, said Dan Forster, Director of the Wildlife Resources Division. These requirements are designed to ensure the prevention, detection and interception of wildlife-related diseases, such as chronic wasting disease and tuberculosis, which can have a devastating impact on our states conservation and agricultural economies.

The statutory purpose of deer farms is to provide an agricultural opportunity to raise non-native deer on a farm for the commercial production of food and fiber. Mr. Jens Brynteson was permitted with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the Georgia Department of Agriculture in 1999 for deer farming, but his license expired March 31 and has not been renewed. The resultant violations include multiple counts of possessing regulated wild animals without authorizing licenses and surrendering regulated wild animals to individuals who do not possess authorizing licenses. Moreover, it was discovered that he was moving farmed deer from one property and placing them in a high-fence shooting pen on a different property. These movements raise concern regarding questionable required health certifications.

In February of 2009, the Department executed search warrants pertaining to property owned by Mr. Jens Brynteson and the residence of his employee Mr. David Kilgore. Various documents and digital media were seized during the search. The seized items assisted Department officials with further identifying violations.

Not only are these types of canned hunts illegal in Georgia, the shooting of farmed deer and sheep for sport in staged hunting venues serves no legitimate role in wildlife conservation and is not supported by the majority of Georgias citizens, said Forster. These types of unethical activities threaten the use of fair chase hunting as an effective, cost-efficient management tool in Georgia and erodes the existing public support for legal hunting.

Due to the fact that the investigation is ongoing no additional information may be released at this time. For more information about DNRs Wildlife Resources Division, visit www.georgiawildlife.com . To report game and fish law violations, such as the illegal movement of non-native or native wildlife, call 1-800-241-4113.

More on Wild Animals and Farmed Deer

According to Georgia code, it is unlawful for any person to import, transport, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal (as listed in O.C.G.A. 27-5-5) without first obtaining a wild animal license (as provided in O.C.G.A. 27-5-4) from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Farmed deer may be legally held in an approved facility with a deer farming license jointly administered by the Department of Natural Resources and the Department of Agriculture.

Additionally, it is unlawful to shoot, kill or wound any wild animal held under a wild animal license or permit or any farmed deer for enjoyment, gain, amusement or sport (O.C.G.A. 27-5-12).

Wild animals are non-native wildlife such as those that may be found in zoos, circuses or educational exhibits. The possession of wild animals is strictly regulated in Georgia because of the risks they pose to public health, safety and welfare, and to native wildlife. These risks include endangering the physical safety of humans, introduction of diseases harmful to humans or wildlife and threats to native wildlife and habitats through competition.

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